Arts & Entertainment

04/14/2017 - 10:12am
The Gentleman from Ohio Louis Stokes shined shoes in Depression-era Cleveland to help supplement his mother’s income as a maid. “We were poor as poor and we knew it,” he writes. But his mother encouraged him and his brother Carl to “get something in your head. Be somebody!” And they did. Carl became the first black mayor of a major American city, and Louis went on to become a criminal defense lawyer and a representative in the US Congress, where he served for 30... >>more
04/14/2017 - 9:12am
Artist Profile: Fierce Sonia   The hands … watch the hands. They guide you to the eyes – the compelling gateway to Fierce Sonia’s personal exploration of the mysterious forces of nature. Once you enter, the visual voices lead you to navigate the explosive colors, intricate patterns, and swirling graphic echoes that move you through the images and further into the story. It is not a literal narrative; it’s about feelings. Each work mirrors what Sonia is... >>more
04/14/2017 - 9:12am
E. Ethelbert Miller has been a DC poet and literary activist for nearly five decades. His important contribution to the local literary scene was recognized in April 2015 with his induction into the Washington, DC. Hall of Fame. The author of several collections of poems and two memoirs, his most recent publication is “The Collected Poems of E. Ethelbert Miller,” which brings together more than 300 poems representing his artistic journey. When he recently posted the poem below on... >>more
04/13/2017 - 10:21am
‘The Sense of an Ending’ Julian Barnes’ “The Sense of an Ending” won the Man Booker Prize as the best English-language novel of 2011. It features an unreliable narrator, Tony Webster, who finds a piece of his past interrupting his unremarkable life. Whether such a novel can work as a film is a good question, and the just-released British movie that takes it on makes a decent effort. (Now in theaters, the film is rated PG-13 and runs 108 minutes.) The film revolves... >>more
04/12/2017 - 9:10am
I Draw Slow is a musical house of mirrors – an Irish band playing original songs influenced by American roots music that draws on Celtic traditions. Whether the members of the band are from Deep Gap or Dublin is ultimately beside the point, because they play old-time music authentically and with conviction. They’ll perform a free outdoor concert at the Hill Center on April 30 at 4 p.m., in support of their new record, “Turn Your Face to the Sun.” I Draw Slow is fronted... >>more
04/11/2017 - 10:11am
While passing a cafeteria notice board in one of Capitol Hill’s House office buildings, Louise Buchanan noticed a call for vocalists. It was 1987, and most of the people she knew worked as staffers day in and day out on the Hill. Buchanan loved music but commuted from Arlington to the Hill each day for work, so opportunities to sing didn’t come up often. When she saw the chance to join chorus director Michael Patterson and other Hill staffers in the group, she did. They became the... >>more
04/11/2017 - 9:12am
With a mighty cast of 20 that feels at times as if it swells to 100, director Peter Flynn’s revival of “Ragtime” at Ford’s Theatre brings to life the pervasive exuberance, tension, and hope at the last century’s dawn. Perhaps unintentionally it also shows the stark contrast between common perceptions of bigotry, racial injustice, and economic inequality when the show premiered on Broadway 20 years ago, and today. It seems almost quaint that in 1997 Americans could... >>more
04/07/2017 - 11:42am
It is late on a Sunday evening. I found myself in the middle of a packed, motionless crowd of people hypnotized by the sounds coming from a large Nordic man manipulating buttons on a synthesizer. This man goes by the name Trentemøller, a Danish electronic musician whose popularity has grown over a gradual period of music festivals in Europe and beyond. Though his synthesizer and accompanied instrumentals were more than enough to bombard the venue with dance-heavy vibration, the crowd... >>more
03/17/2017 - 10:15am
Kenneth Carroll IIIwas selected by Words Beats & Life as the 2017 DC Youth Poet Laureate. He began performing as a sophomore at Wilson High School and continues to participate in poetry slams and readings throughout the Metropolitan DC area. Carroll, who self-identifies as “a total nerd,” is interested in issues of identity and social justice. Part of the latest generation in a tradition of the black literary arts movement in the District, Carroll’s work speaks to the... >>more